Welcome to Los Angeles – Good Magazine

I followed up with documentary series as a companion piece to the story called “On Skid Row”. It was a rehashing of my work in the LA Weekly, so they weren’t elated about that, but it was eclipsed by the opportunity to give a national voice to local issue. They employed the Kenneth Cole Awearness blog to promote it and MySpace featured me as an “Impact Filmmaker” for a month…. so a lot of people saw it. In a sense in was a corporate clusterfuck, but working with Lindsay Utz (editor/producer) was a big step up for me. I’m still getting emails about it from people looking to directly engage with the community… who mostly all are still there.

I followed up with documentary series as a companion piece to the story called “On Skid Row”. It was a rehashing of my work in the LA Weekly, so they weren’t elated about that, but it was eclipsed by the opportunity to give a national voice to local issue. They employed the Kenneth Cole Awearness blog to promote it and MySpace featured me as an “Impact Filmmaker” for a month…. so a lot of people saw it. In a sense in was a corporate clusterfuck, but working with Lindsay Utz (editor/producer) was a big step up for me. I’m still getting emails about it from people looking to directly engage with the community… who mostly all are still there.

I did a story on transgenerational poverty  / skid row in L.A. for Good magazine.

I followed up with documentary series as a companion piece to the story called “On Skid Row”. It was an opportunity to give a national voice to local issue. They employed the Kenneth Cole Awearness blog to promote it and MySpace featured me as an “Impact Filmmaker” for a month…. so a lot of people saw it. In a sense in was a corporate clusterfuck, but working with Lindsay Utz (editor/producer) was a big step up for me. I’m still getting emails about it.


Welcome to Los Angeles

by Sam Slovick

GOOD MAGAZINE

With one of the country’s most notorious slums sitting within spitting distance of new million-dollar lofts and five-star hotels, Los Angeles is using tough new policing to clean up its worst eyesore. For the children of Skid Row, though, it’s business as usual—finding shelter, trying to stay out of trouble, and most of all, getting out.

 

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